Quick Answer: Can Vs Could Grammar?

Will you vs Can you?

May implies that you are asking for permission.

Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability.

Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future..

Can could tenses?

Can is called a modal verb. It doesn’t have all of the tenses that verbs usually have. It has the simple past tense could, but no past participle. When a past participle is needed, the expression be able to is used instead.

Where is could used?

Could: “Could” is used to express possibility. Something that could happen is not necessarily something that must happen. Could does not express desire or opinion. It is simply used to state one or more things that are possible (even if they are unlikely) or were possible in the past (even if they didn’t happen).

Can be Vs could be?

If you use “can be” in that sentence, you will sound more certain about the advantage. Speakers tend to use “can” instead of “could” when they are fairly certain about something. If you use “could be” in that sentence, you will sound less certain about the advantage. “Could be” is hypothetical or uncertain.

Is could you please rude?

First of all, “could you please” sounds more polite and less rude. When we say “Can you please…”, the question actually asks the subject whether they are capable of doing something. … On the contrary, “Could you please…” is a request which may be granted by the subject under favourable circumstances.

Which is more polite can you or could you?

To answer the question: “could” definitely sounds slightly more polite than “can” to a native speaker since it is less direct and more deferential as a result. “Could” is a form of “can”, so both are technically asking “are you able to…”. This is not the difference between the two.

Could have been meaning?

Could have means that something was possible in the past, but it did not happen. … Native speakers often do not pronounce their past tense modals as clearly as Tiffany. Could have been usually gets contracted to could’ve been or even coulda’ been.

Can and could grammar?

We use can and can’t to talk about the ability to do something at a specific time in the present or future: … We use could and couldn’t to talk about the past: She could speak several languages.

Could you VS would you?

But I would suppose that “would” is more polite, because it expresses the idea of probability, and of willingness, and of the desire that something be done, whereas “could” is more in the realm of ability (yes I can). And according to the American Heritage Dictionary, “would” is used to make a polite request.

Do I VS should I?

“Do/Should I?” is a request. You are asking what ought to be done. It can be used as above, but does not always indicate the speaker’s preferred action and often indicates doubt or ignorance of the proper choice. For asking advice in American-English in a colloquial context, only “should” sounds good to me.

Do I know you rude?

“Do I know you?” is not infrequently said with a sneer or in a very cold tone to indicate to someone that to the speaker they are utterly insignificant, not at all relevant. In that sense, it is very rude!

Is as requested rude?

Dictionary defines to request as to politely or formally ask for something. So by definition it is not rude.

Can V could?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Would sentences examples in English?

Would sentence examplesWould you like to read his speech? … That would be the best way. … How long would these mind games go on? … His father hoped that Daniel would grow up to be a wise and famous man. … He was in trouble because his scholars would not study. … Would you like it again?More items…

Would usage in sentence?

We use reported speech to tell others what someone else said – without using their exact words. In reported speech clauses, “would” is the past tense of “will.”…The Many Uses of ‘Would’ in Everyday Speech, Part 1.Uses of ‘Would’ExampleStructureRepeated past actionsWhen I was little, I would play hopscotch with my friends.Main clause= would + simple verb form7 more rows•Jun 28, 2018

Can have been sentences?

A: – During our phone calls, Peter assured me he fed my cat every week, but now she is dead! B: – Can he have been lying? [Question: possible, though I’d say “could he have been” is better here.] A: – No, he can’t have been lying, he has been my best friend for years.

What is the meaning of have been?

“Have been” is a verb used to form the present perfect tense, and when followed by a present participle (such as “running”, “walking”, “doing” etc.), the present perfect continuous tense. This means that an action is going on continuously and has not been completed at this moment.

Can you rude?

Using can instead of may isn’t necessarily rude, though there are times when may is considered more polite. It depends on the context. Can refers to ability. May could be used to request permission or to express a possibility.

Can I use could for future?

We often use could to express possibility in the present and the future.

Would VS should grammar?

“Would” is the past tense of the modal verb “will.” Used as an auxiliary, “would” expresses a possibility, an intention, a desire, a custom, or a request. Use “should” to express an obligation, a necessity, or a prediction; use “would” to express a wish or a customary action.

Can have been?

While Can’t Have (Been) is used to refer to an incident in the near past, Couldn’t Have (Been) is used for an event that happened way back in the past. When it comes to modal verbs — the verbs that express necessity or possibility — many learners find them rather confusing.

Would U be rude?

Could you tell me the way to the station? literally you are asking if the person knows the way to the station and can tell you. As a question it is implied that you are hoping for the answer, but permission or whether the person wishes to answer is not addressed. As such, using would is more polite.

Why is asking rude?

Beginning an answer with the word “why” is not inherently rude; the answer could be rude because of its content, of course. This construct is definitely somewhat archaic, and I’ve seen it more often in British contexts than American.